The Accidental Buddha

ramblings of a man in search of enlightenment

You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is like an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.

—Mahatma Gandhi (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via purplebuddhaproject)

Seven Deadly Sins

Wealth without work
Pleasure without conscience
Science without humanity
Knowledge without character
Politics without principle
Commerce without morality
Worship without sacrifice.

—Mahatma Gandhi (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via purplebuddhaproject)

Why Everyone Should Try Meditation

jordan-phoenix:

To understand meditation in a nutshell, go get a camera and take two pictures of the same thing.

For the first, hold your camera as still as possible, and take a picture.

For the second, shake your camera back and forth as fast as you can while you snap the photo.

The…

Life has no meaning. Each of us has meaning and we bring it to life. It is a waste to be asking the question when you are the answer.

Everything changes when you start to emit your own frequency rather than absorbing the frequencies around you, when you start imprinting your intent on the universe rather than receiving an imprint from existence.

Barbara Marciniak (via purplebuddhaproject)

Anonymous asked: Do you have any "beginners" guides as bad as that sounds. I'd love to explore a little in Buddhism.

purplebuddhaproject:

• What is Buddhism?

Buddhism is a religion to about 300 million people around the world. The word comes from ‘budhi’, ‘to awaken’. It has its origins about 2,500 years ago when Siddhartha Gotama, known as the Buddha, was himself awakened (enlightened) at the age of 35.

• Is Buddhism a Religion?

To many, Buddhism goes beyond religion and is more of a philosophy or ‘way of life’. It is a philosophy because philosophy ‘means love of wisdom’ and the Buddhist path can be summed up as:

(1) to lead a moral life,
(2) to be mindful and aware of thoughts and actions, and
(3) to develop wisdom and understanding.

• How Can Buddhism Help Me?

Buddhism explains a purpose to life, it explains apparent injustice and inequality around the world, and it provides a code of practice or way of life that leads to true happiness.

• Who Was the Buddha?

Siddhartha Gotama was born into a royal family in Lumbini, now located in Nepal, in 563 BC. At 29, he realised that wealth and luxury did not guarantee happiness, so he explored the different teachings religions and philosophies of the day, to find the key to human happiness. After six years of study and meditation he finally found ‘the middle path’ and was enlightened. After enlightenment, the Buddha spent the rest of his life teaching the principles of Buddhism — called the Dhamma, or Truth — until his death at the age of 80.

• Was the Buddha a God?

He was not, nor did he claim to be. He was a man who taught a path to enlightenment from his own experience.

• Do Buddhists Worship Idols?

Buddhists sometimes pay respect to images of the Buddha, not in worship, nor to ask for favours. A statue of the Buddha with hands rested gently in its lap and a compassionate smile reminds us to strive to develop peace and love within ourselves. Bowing to the statue is an expression of gratitude for the teaching.

• What did the Buddha Teach?

The Buddha taught many things, but the basic concepts in Buddhism can be summed up by the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path.

Namaste,

Forrest Curran

ahara-nidra-bhaya-maithunam ca samanyam etat pashubhih naranam dharmo hi tesham adhiko vishesho dharmena hina pashubhih samanah

Eating, sleeping, fearing, and mating are the four principles of animal life. These are common both to animals and to human beings. But faith is the extra function of the human being. Without faith, human life is no better than animal life.

—The Mahabharata  (via panatmansam)

Our theories of the eternal are as valuable as are those that a chick which has not broken its way through its shell might form of the outside world.

—Gautama Buddha (via purplebuddhaproject)

If you were awake, you would understand that you were the whole universe projecting itself at a point called here and now, in the form of the human organism. And you would understand that very clearly, not just as an idea, but as an actual vivid sensation, just the same way you know you’re sitting in this room.

—Alan Watts (via liberatingreality)

(via panatmansam)


“Make your own Bible. Select and collect all the words and sentences that in all your readings have been to you like the blast of a trumpet.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

This quote really struck a note with me when I first read it, and I’ve been thinking about it ever since. I call myself a Buddhist, but I’ve been influenced by a number of philosophies and religions, including Christianity, Taoism, Hindi, Buddhism, etc, and the writings of many people. Each has certain aspects that I truly believe in, as well as certain cultural baggage that has little or no meaning to me. The idea of creating a compendium for my beliefs is truly marvelous.
I went out and picked up a large blank Moleskine journal, and printed out a writing template based on a Golden section ( http://rodgraves.com/moleskine/ ). I’ll be using the journal to hand write quotes and ideas that truly resound within my heart. The margins will be free for me to add notes and drawings over time.
It will be interesting to see what makes it into the journal. Even more interesting will be to look back at it years from now, to see how my beliefs and priorities have slowly evolved over time.

“Make your own Bible. Select and collect all the words and sentences that in all your readings have been to you like the blast of a trumpet.”

― Ralph Waldo Emerson

This quote really struck a note with me when I first read it, and I’ve been thinking about it ever since. I call myself a Buddhist, but I’ve been influenced by a number of philosophies and religions, including Christianity, Taoism, Hindi, Buddhism, etc, and the writings of many people. Each has certain aspects that I truly believe in, as well as certain cultural baggage that has little or no meaning to me. The idea of creating a compendium for my beliefs is truly marvelous.

I went out and picked up a large blank Moleskine journal, and printed out a writing template based on a Golden section ( http://rodgraves.com/moleskine/ ). I’ll be using the journal to hand write quotes and ideas that truly resound within my heart. The margins will be free for me to add notes and drawings over time.

It will be interesting to see what makes it into the journal. Even more interesting will be to look back at it years from now, to see how my beliefs and priorities have slowly evolved over time.